TICAS Statement on Trump Administration’s FY20 Budget for Higher Education

March 11, 2019

Today’s budget proposal would raise would costs and increase student debt. The Administration would make students pay $207 billion more on their student loans, a dangerously wrong-headed proposal. Overall, to cut the Department of Education’s annual funding by 12 percent, the Administration would cut Pell grant funding, eliminate SEOG scholarships, and halve work-study funding....


Mixed News for Pell in Senate Education Spending Bill

June 28, 2018

This afternoon the Senate Appropriations Committee approved a fiscal year 2019 education spending bill that increases the Pell award by a modest but meaningful $100, and cuts $600 million from the Pell Grant reserve fund. A broad coalition of Pell advocates has for years urged Congress to protect and strengthen the grant, including in a letter earlier this week from over 65 organizations,...


House Launches New Attack on College Access and Affordability

June 21, 2018

The House Budget Committee’s fiscal year 2019 Budget Resolution, expected to pass out of committee this evening, calls for astonishing cuts to student financial aid as part of a package that exceeds $200 billion over the next decade. The simultaneous cuts to student loans and Pell Grants would be a devastating one-two punch to students already struggling to afford college.


Statement on FY18 Omnibus Budget and Pell Grant Funding

March 21, 2018

We are grateful that Congress has heeded the recent call from over 60 diverse, national organizations to prioritize Pell Grants in the FY18 Omnibus. The bill released tonight eliminates a previously proposed cut to Pell Grant program reserve funds, and in doing so will help keep the program on solid fiscal footing in the coming years. The bill also raises the maximum Pell Grant...


TICAS Statement on Trump Administration’s FY19 Budget for Higher Education

February 12, 2018

The Trump Administration's proposed budget would push the cost of college even further out of reach for millions of students. It would raise student loan payments by more than $200 billion over the next decade. Additionally, it would cut the Department of Education's annual funding by almost $4 billion, while intentionally and unnecessarily leaving tens of billions of dollars...